Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences

Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences

The Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences was founded on 1 January 2022 through the merger of two existing Göttingen institutes, the MPI for Biophysical Chemistry and the MPI for Experimental Medicine. The two locations of the institutes remained as City Campus and Faßberg Campus.

At the Institute, we explore scientific issues ranging from physics and chemistry to structural and cell biology, neuroscience and biomedical research. Basic research in the natural sciences can thus be linked even more effectively with medical research approaches.

We are guided by the conviction that great scientific discoveries can be achieved when scientists from different disciplines and research cultures - such as physics, chemistry and biology - work together and exchange ideas in an unbiased way.

Contact

Am Faßberg 11
37077 Göttingen
Phone: +49 551 201-1211

PhD opportunities

This institute has several International Max Planck Research Schools (IMPRS):

IMPRS for Physics of Biological and Complex Systems
IMPRS for Molecular Biology
IMPRS for Genome Science
IMPRS for Neurosciences

In addition, there is the possibility of individual doctoral research. Please contact the directors or research group leaders at the Institute.

Department Molecular Neurobiology

more

Department Cellular Logistics

more

Department NMR based Structural Biology

more

Department Theoretical and Computational Biophysics

more

Department NanoBiophotonics

more

Department Tissue Dynamics and Regeneration

more

Department Ultrafast Dynamics

more

Department Molecular Cell Biology

more

Department Molecular Developmental Biology

more

Department Membrane Biophysics

more

Department Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals

more

It is thanks to magnetic resonance imaging MRI – and not least Jens Frahm – that doctors are better able to diagnose diseases among patients than they could 30 years ago. The research conducted by the Director of the non-profit making company Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen has succeeded in significantly improving the images made of the body. In the interim, the team from Goettingen has even been able to push MRI from photography to filming.

STED microscopes can produce extremely detailed images of everything from the transport of individual proteins or tiny membrane vesicles in living cells to the synapses of neurons or the skeletons of tumor cells. The technique was invented by Stefan Hell, Director at the Max Planck Institutes for Biophysical Chemistry in Goettingen and Medical Research in Heidelberg. Now, the spin-off company Abberior Instruments sells the highest-resolution fluorescence microscope on the market – and researchers at both the Institutes and the company continue to push the resolution to its ultimate limit: the single nanometer size scale of a molecule.

Evotec’s history illustrates that biotechnology made in Germany can set standards worldwide. The Max Planck Society is one of the company’s founders and continues to shape it to this day.

Egg and sperm cells are highly sensitive during their development. When, for example, there is an error in the way the genetic material is divided between the individual gametes, the resulting embryo will often either be nonviable or suffer from severe birth defects. Melina Schuh from the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen wants to find out why egg maturation is so error-prone. The results of her research could one day help couples who are unable to have children.

Doctors and patients can thank magnetic resonance imaging – and not least Jens Frahm – for the fact that many diseases can now be diagnosed far more effectively than they could 30 years ago. The research carried out by the director of the Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH (non-profit) at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen has greatly simplified the process of capturing images of the body’s interior. Now the team from Göttingen wants to bring those images to life.

Ludwig II of Bavaria is a particularly striking example of how differently people’s internal clocks can tick. According to historical sources, the monarch usually conducted his government business at night and slept during the day. Whether the Fairy Tale King had a disorder that disrupted his sleep-wake rhythm is a matter even Gregor Eichele can only speculate about. Nevertheless, Eichele and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen have gained much new insight into how the body’s natural timekeepers work.

Trying to controvert a seemingly incontrovertible law is a hard job. And Stefan Hell discovered just how hard when he attempted to thwart the resolution limit of optical microscopes. Initially, his ideas fell on deaf ears. Today, however, Stefan Hell is a Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry.

Student research assistant (f/m/d) | Tissue dynamics and regeneration

Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences, Göttingen January 05, 2022

PhD Students (f/m/d) | Genome Science

Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences, Göttingen December 27, 2021

PhD Student or Postdoctoral Fellow (f/m/d) | Development of nanobodies for therapeutic applications

Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences, Göttingen December 23, 2021

No research reports available
Go to Editor View