News

Cpf1: CRISPR-enzyme scissors cutting both RNA and DNA

April 20, 2016

Scientists delineate molecular details of a new bacterial CRISPR-Cpf1 system and open possible avenue for alternative gene editing uses like targeting several genes in parallel [more]

Molecular biology

Genome Editing

Gene scissors, molecular scalpel – these descriptive terms are intended to convey what the new method of gene editing with rather unwieldy name of CRISPR/Cas9 can do. As they suggest, the system, which, in its natural form, consists of two RNA molecules and one protein molecule, can cleave the hereditary molecule DNA. Moreover, it can do this with surgical precision at a specific site in the genome. This enables researchers to switch genes off or insert new sequences at the cutting site. As a result, DNA can be modified much faster and more easily than was possible using previous gene-editing methods. Although the system basically sounds simple, various factors must be coordinated with extreme precision for the gene scissors to be able to function with such accuracy. For this reason, even after 30 years of research, the functioning of CRISPR/Cas9 is still not entirely understood.
For Emmanuelle Charpentier, deciphering the functioning of an enzyme previously known only to experts was a life-changing moment

Emmanuelle Charpentier: An artist in gene editing

February 07, 2017

For Emmanuelle Charpentier, deciphering the functioning of an enzyme previously known only to experts was a life-changing moment [more]
Stefan Mundlos, Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin, holds a very critical view of interventions in the human germline

“No authorization exists for such research”

April 19, 2016

Stefan Mundlos, Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin, holds a very critical view of interventions in the human germline [more]
Scientists from China, the United States and Germany, among them Detlef Weigel of the Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, propose a regulatory framework for genome editing in plants

Proposal for the assessment of new methods in plant breeding

Scientists from China, the United States and Germany, among them Detlef Weigel of the Max-Planck-Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, propose a regulatory framework for genome editing in plants [more]

Gen-editing mit CRISPR/Cas9 (english subtitles)

At first, the discovery that bacteria are able to fight viruses with a adaptable immune system attracted only microbiologists. Only when scientists found out that CRISPR/Cas9, as the defence mechanism is called, is also suited for manipulating the genome of all kinds of organisms the system recieved broad attention. Find out how it works.
 
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