Social Media

Director positions

MaxPlanckResearch Magazine

It’s found in the basic building blocks of matter and in the vast expanses of the universe, in flowers, in butterflies and in our own bodies: symmetry is deeply embedded in nature. Perfect symmetry, however, is rare, and it is often precisely the little differences that offer the key advantage for our existence. To understand this phenomenon, researchers are studying such topics as antimatter, the human brain, or the development of flatworms.

Focus 'Symmetry'

It’s found in the basic building blocks of matter and in the vast expanses of the universe, in flowers, in butterflies and in our own bodies: symmetry is deeply embedded in nature. Perfect symmetry, however, is rare, and it is often precisely the little differences that offer the key advantage for our existence. To understand this phenomenon, researchers are studying such topics as antimatter, the human brain, or the development of flatworms. [more]

Incubating shorebirds

Unexpected diversity in socially synchronized rhythms of shorebirds

Parents need to synchronize the care for their offspring. In shorebirds, this leads to extreme and unexpected diversity in how parents attend their nest, finds an international team led by researchers from the MPI for Ornithology.

Jobboard

Job Offers

Images from science

In Vanuatu - the "Galapagos of languages" - researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History are investigating what drives language diversity.

On the trail of the Galapagos of language evolution

In Vanuatu - the "Galapagos of languages" - researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History are investigating what drives language diversity. [more]
A synthetic metabolic pathway developed by Tobias Erb and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg converts CO2 from the atmosphere into organic matter more efficiently than plants are able to through photosynthesis.

“We are trying to develop CO2 as a source of carbon”

November 25, 2016

A synthetic metabolic pathway developed by Tobias Erb and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology in Marburg converts CO2 from the atmosphere into organic matter more efficiently than plants are able to through photosynthesis. [more]
During his election campaign, Donald Trump referred to as NATO as “obsolete” and he also announced that he would withdraw the USA from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Paris climate agreement. Matthias Hartwig from the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law explains the impact international law treaties can have and where their limits lie.

The trend for isolationism in international law

November 28, 2016

During his election campaign, Donald Trump referred to as NATO as “obsolete” and he also announced that he would withdraw the USA from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Paris climate agreement. Matthias Hartwig from the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law explains the impact international law treaties can have and where their limits lie. [more]
Vaxxilon is developing carbohydrate-based vaccine candidates that should make vaccinations against bacterial infections cheaper in the future.

Vaxxilon named “Science Start-Up of the Year 2016”

November 17, 2016

Vaxxilon is developing carbohydrate-based vaccine candidates that should make vaccinations against bacterial infections cheaper in the future. [more]
Two high-level Max Planck symposia and one workshop will take place in Buenos Aires and Rosario in Argentina from 14 to 19 November. Leading scientists from Argentina and other Latin American countries will be participating along with more than 45 Directors from Max Planck Institutes, including Max Planck Nobel laureates Erwin Neher and Klaus von Klitzing.

Science summit in Argentina

November 14, 2016

Two high-level Max Planck symposia and one workshop will take place in Buenos Aires and Rosario in Argentina from 14 to 19 November. Leading scientists from Argentina and other Latin American countries will be participating along with more than 45 Directors from Max Planck Institutes, including Max Planck Nobel laureates Erwin Neher and Klaus von Klitzing. [more]
 
loading content