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Max Planck Research Group Leader

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It’s found in the basic building blocks of matter and in the vast expanses of the universe, in flowers, in butterflies and in our own bodies: symmetry is deeply embedded in nature. Perfect symmetry, however, is rare, and it is often precisely the little differences that offer the key advantage for our existence. To understand this phenomenon, researchers are studying such topics as antimatter, the human brain, or the development of flatworms.

MaxPlanckResearch Magazine: Focus 'Symmetry'

It’s found in the basic building blocks of matter and in the vast expanses of the universe, in flowers, in butterflies and in our own bodies: symmetry is deeply embedded in nature. Perfect symmetry, however, is rare, and it is often precisely the little differences that offer the key advantage for our existence. To understand this phenomenon, researchers are studying such topics as antimatter, the human brain, or the development of flatworms. [more]

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Without language there would be no business or politics, religion or science, law or poetry. However, the phenomenon of language holds many mysteries: What is the origin of this uniquely human aptitude? How do children learn to talk? And what forms has language developed in different parts of the world? An overview of important research questions.

Language and speech

September 25, 2016

Without language there would be no business or politics, religion or science, law or poetry. However, the phenomenon of language holds many mysteries: What is the origin of this uniquely human aptitude? How do children learn to talk? And what forms has language developed in different parts of the world? An overview of important research questions.

One day, microrobots may be able to swim through the human body like sperm or paramecia to carry out medical functions in specific locations. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have developed functional elastomers, which can be activated by magnetic fields to imitate the swimming gaits of natural flagella, cilia and jellyfish.

Shape-programmable miniscule robots

September 26, 2016

One day, microrobots may be able to swim through the human body like sperm or paramecia to carry out medical functions in specific locations. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have developed functional elastomers, which can be activated by magnetic fields to imitate the swimming gaits of natural flagella, cilia and jellyfish. [more]
Max Planck Director will help identify new groundbreaking research areas for a healthy human life

Tobias Bonhoeffer appointed scientific advisor of Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

September 22, 2016

Max Planck Director will help identify new groundbreaking research areas for a healthy human life [more]
Sound can now be structured in three dimensions. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and the University of Stuttgart have found a way of generating acoustic holograms, which could improve ultrasound diagnostics and material testing. The holograms can also be used to move and manipulate particles.

Holograms with sound

September 21, 2016

Sound can now be structured in three dimensions. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and the University of Stuttgart have found a way of generating acoustic holograms, which could improve ultrasound diagnostics and material testing. The holograms can also be used to move and manipulate particles. [more]
It is regarded as one of the most prestigious scientific awards: This year’s Balzan Prize from Italy goes to neurobiologist Reinhard Jahn from Göttingen. The Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry is being awarded the Prize in the field of molecular and cellular neurosciences.

Balzan Prize for Reinhard Jahn

September 21, 2016

It is regarded as one of the most prestigious scientific awards: This year’s Balzan Prize from Italy goes to neurobiologist Reinhard Jahn from Göttingen. The Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry is being awarded the Prize in the field of molecular and cellular neurosciences. [more]
 
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