Cell Biology

Promising target for new RNA therapeutics now accessible

Scientists have identified the first inhibitors of a cancer-related RNA-modifier more

Illustration of two mitochondria (cellular power plants) that form the two halves of a Yin-and-Yang sign.

In nerve cells, the hormone regulates whether mitochondria are shut down or kept running more

UV in the sunlight not only damages our DNA but also our RNA. After cell division, the DHX9 proteins from the mother cells assemble into stress granules to sequester the damaged RNA and shield the daughter cells

Stress granules protect cells from the effects of UV radiation more

How HIV smuggles its genetic material into the cell nucleus

The capsid of the virus acts as a molecular transporter more

Illustration of a cell with its various components. The protein-protein interactions, in other words the social network of proteins, are represented by the red, orange and green lines. The corner points of the connections each symbolize an investigated protein in the cell.

A research team maps the entire protein network architecture of a cell more

The epigenome of hepatocytes changes with increasing age. The figure shows a graphical representation of epigenetic measurement data. The further apart two points are, the more different is the epigenome of the cells.

Liver cells age differently depending on where they are in the organ more

Protein stock for the beginning of a new life

Cytoplasmic lattices in the egg cell supply the early embryo as protein storage sites more

Epigenetic regulator drives mitochondrial metabolism

The enzyme MOF regulates genes in the nucleus, but also modifies metabolic proteins in the mitochondria more

"Radar" detects active cellular destroyers

New method could facilitate development of new "degrader" therapies that harness the power to destroy unwanted proteins more

Molecular structure of the mTOR complex

Endogenous metabolite directly inhibits mTORC1 activity more

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UV in the sunlight not only damages our DNA but also our RNA. After cell division, the DHX9 proteins from the mother cells assemble into stress granules to sequester the damaged RNA and shield the daughter cells

Stress granules protect cells from the effects of UV radiation more

How HIV smuggles its genetic material into the cell nucleus

The capsid of the virus acts as a molecular transporter more

Illustration of a cell with its various components. The protein-protein interactions, in other words the social network of proteins, are represented by the red, orange and green lines. The corner points of the connections each symbolize an investigated protein in the cell.

A research team maps the entire protein network architecture of a cell more

The epigenome of hepatocytes changes with increasing age. The figure shows a graphical representation of epigenetic measurement data. The further apart two points are, the more different is the epigenome of the cells.

Liver cells age differently depending on where they are in the organ more

Protein stock for the beginning of a new life

Cytoplasmic lattices in the egg cell supply the early embryo as protein storage sites more

Nematode from the ice age

A newly discovered nematode species from the Pleistocene shares a molecular toolkit for survival with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans more

Nature-inspired compounds chop up cancer gene’s RNA

Resarchers have found new possibilities for targeting cancer genes’ RNA with nature-inspired compounds more

A look into the heart of cellular waste disposal

Researchers reveal how a nanomachine takes care of cleaning up inside the cell more

Optically controlled rotation of a worm embryo in its eggshell using FLUCS

With FLUCS, the development of embryos can be controlled more

Wiggly proteins guard the genome

Dynamic network in the pores of the nuclear envelope blocks dangerous invaders more

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A missing ‘motor’ causes our eggs to fail

Human eggs are missing an important protein, which acts as a molecular motor, as researchers have found out. Their findings open up new avenues for therapeutic approaches that could reduce chromosome segregation errors in human eggs. more

Life with light and colour: a biochemical conversation

Mathias Grote, science historian and Heisenberg Fellow at Humboldt University, talks with Dieter Oesterhelt about his research more

Building with DNA

Life on Earth developed from inanimate components. Can we recreate this process in the laboratory, and what tools do we need for this? Using DNA origami, the art of folding at a scale of just a few millionths of a millimetre, we are able to reconstruct individual cellular components. They may be capable of taking over important tasks in our bodies in future. more

A new genome for regeneration research

First complete genome assembly of planarian flatworm reveals treasure trove on the function and evolution of genes more

Decoding the Axolotl genome

The sequencing of the largest genome to date lays the foundation for novel insights into tissue regeneration more

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodies

Max Planck researchers develop sustainable alternative to the most widely used antibodies and their controversial production in animals more

To trim away a protein

Scientists present a novel method to directly and rapidly destroy any protein in any kind of cell more

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time

Researchers identify almost 11,000 different proteins throughout the heart more

Information filter for immune defence

Researchers are deciphering the structure of the MHC-I peptide-loading complex. more

By using innovative labeling methods, Max Planck researchers develop a technique to measure newly synthesized proteins in the active mouse brain more

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Chaperones

Chaperones

Video November 14, 2016

Nothing works without the correct form: For most proteins, there are millions of ways in which these molecules, composed of long chains of amino acids, can be folded - but only one way is the right one. Researchers in the department "Cellular Biochemistry" at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried examine how this origami in cells works and what happens if something goes awry. Franz Ulrich Hartl and his team are interested in both the underlying mechanisms and the structure of the molecules involved.Further information more

A Library of Proteins

A Library of Proteins

Video December 12, 2012

About 12,000 proteins are produced in typical human cells – more than 120,000 various proteins in total. Matthias Mann at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany, has set himself the target of establishing a protein library of the human body. Not an easy project - because in contrast to genes, proteins are extremely variable. In addition, many various factors influence which proteins a cell produces. Nevertheless, Mann is able to identify the proteins with mass spectrometry, nanochromatography and special computer software. more

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