Cell Biology

The “Oscars in Science”

Anthony Hyman and Clifford Brangwynne receive the world's largest science prize, the 2023 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences more

Award Ceremony of the Körber Prize for Anthony Hyman

The director of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden received the Körber Prize in Hamburg's City Hall for the discovery of a completely new state of biological matter more

Cinderella of chemical biology

Small molecules, largely ignored until now, have regulatory functions in stress reduction more

A missing ‘motor’ causes our eggs to fail

Human eggs are missing an important protein, which acts as a molecular motor, as researchers have found out. Their findings open up new avenues for therapeutic approaches that could reduce chromosome segregation errors in human eggs. more

Cool microscopy

Ultrarapid cooling enables the observation of molecular patterns of life
  more

Catch me if you can: how mRNA therapeutics are delivered into cells

Researchers have found where and how mRNA arrives in a cell to modify or deliver genetic information, a crucial process for the development of novel therapies more

miR1 and miR133a block division of heart cells

Approach for strengthening heart regeneration discovered more

Molecular scales on biological membranes

With mass-sensitive particle tracking scientists can determine location and size changes of unlabeled proteins on membranes more

Life with light and colour: a biochemical conversation

Mathias Grote, science historian and Heisenberg Fellow at Humboldt University, talks with Dieter Oesterhelt about his research more

How pruning the cytoskeleton moves the cell

An interdisciplinary team of Max Planck Scientists has unraveled the enigmatic mechanism behind actin branching more

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The “Oscars in Science”

Anthony Hyman and Clifford Brangwynne receive the world's largest science prize, the 2023 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences more

Award Ceremony of the Körber Prize for Anthony Hyman

The director of the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden received the Körber Prize in Hamburg's City Hall for the discovery of a completely new state of biological matter more

Cool microscopy

Ultrarapid cooling enables the observation of molecular patterns of life
  more

Manufacturing the core engine of cell division

By modelling the kinetochore from scratch, Max Planck Institute’s researchers get a step closer to creating artificial chromosomes more

What termites and cells have in common

A synthetic cell with life-like properties reveals fundamental principles of morphogenesis and perception more

Gut to brain: nerve cells detect what we eat

Nerve cells of the vagus nerve fulfil opposing tasks more

Top address for life science research

Bavaria invests up to 500 million euros in the competitive development of the Martinsried Max Planck Campus into an outstanding international research hub more

Keeping sperm cells on track

Researchers point to a new mechanism underlying male infertility more

The web of death

A new approach to cancer therapy: molecular networks drive tumor cells into self-destruction more

Nerve cells with energy saving program

Thanks to a metabolic adjustment, the cells can remain functional despite damage to the mitochondria more

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A missing ‘motor’ causes our eggs to fail

Human eggs are missing an important protein, which acts as a molecular motor, as researchers have found out. Their findings open up new avenues for therapeutic approaches that could reduce chromosome segregation errors in human eggs. more

Life with light and colour: a biochemical conversation

Mathias Grote, science historian and Heisenberg Fellow at Humboldt University, talks with Dieter Oesterhelt about his research more

Building with DNA

Life on Earth developed from inanimate components. Can we recreate this process in the laboratory, and what tools do we need for this? Using DNA origami, the art of folding at a scale of just a few millionths of a millimetre, we are able to reconstruct individual cellular components. They may be capable of taking over important tasks in our bodies in future. more

A new genome for regeneration research

First complete genome assembly of planarian flatworm reveals treasure trove on the function and evolution of genes more

Decoding the Axolotl genome

The sequencing of the largest genome to date lays the foundation for novel insights into tissue regeneration more

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodies

Max Planck researchers develop sustainable alternative to the most widely used antibodies and their controversial production in animals more

To trim away a protein

Scientists present a novel method to directly and rapidly destroy any protein in any kind of cell more

Proteome of the human heart mapped for the first time

Researchers identify almost 11,000 different proteins throughout the heart more

Information filter for immune defence

Researchers are deciphering the structure of the MHC-I peptide-loading complex. more

By using innovative labeling methods, Max Planck researchers develop a technique to measure newly synthesized proteins in the active mouse brain more

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Chaperones

Chaperones

Video November 14, 2016

Nothing works without the correct form: For most proteins, there are millions of ways in which these molecules, composed of long chains of amino acids, can be folded - but only one way is the right one. Researchers in the department "Cellular Biochemistry" at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried examine how this origami in cells works and what happens if something goes awry. Franz Ulrich Hartl and his team are interested in both the underlying mechanisms and the structure of the molecules involved. more

A Library of Proteins

A Library of Proteins

Video December 12, 2012

About 12,000 proteins are produced in typical human cells – more than 120,000 various proteins in total. Matthias Mann at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany, has set himself the target of establishing a protein library of the human body. Not an easy project - because in contrast to genes, proteins are extremely variable. In addition, many various factors influence which proteins a cell produces. Nevertheless, Mann is able to identify the proteins with mass spectrometry, nanochromatography and special computer software. more

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