Ecology (Biology & Medicine)

Scientists unearth another brain-shrinking mammal

A study of moles reveals that cold weather – not lack of food – drives the rare phenomenon of reversible brain shrinkage in mammals more

Post from Lima, Peru

Andrea Müller from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has been studying plants that live symbiotically with ants in Peru. Below, she shares her enthusiasm for the rainforest and how, in addition to the coronavirus, protesting coca farmers can jeopardize scientific field work. more

Pollination by Crustaceans

Bee of the sea: A small marine isopod aids in pollinating red algae more

Tobacco hawkmoths always find the right odor

The moths can distinguish crucial from irrelevant odors more

Microparticles with feeling

Researchers develop a new method to simultaneously measure flow and oxygen more

Adaption to island life

Wild populations of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana from the Cape Verde Islands reveal the mechanisms of adaptation after abrupt environmental change
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Unexpected benefits from competitors

When laying their eggs, female hawkmoths rather share a host plant with competitors in order to escape from parasitic wasps more

Gut enzyme in cockchafer larvae activates dandelion defense mechanism

Removing the sugar component from a toxin in dandelion roots increases larval growth while simultaneously deterring the larvae from feeding more

A fish on its way to new shores

Ice Age bones reveal how sticklebacks adapt to new habitats more

Small “snowflakes” in the sea play a big role

New findings from scientists of Bremen will aid in the further development of biogeochemical models that include the marine nitrogen cycle more

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Scientists unearth another brain-shrinking mammal

A study of moles reveals that cold weather – not lack of food – drives the rare phenomenon of reversible brain shrinkage in mammals more

Pollination by Crustaceans

Bee of the sea: A small marine isopod aids in pollinating red algae more

Tobacco hawkmoths always find the right odor

The moths can distinguish crucial from irrelevant odors more

Microparticles with feeling

Researchers develop a new method to simultaneously measure flow and oxygen more

A fish on its way to new shores

Ice Age bones reveal how sticklebacks adapt to new habitats more

Small “snowflakes” in the sea play a big role

New findings from scientists of Bremen will aid in the further development of biogeochemical models that include the marine nitrogen cycle more

Balanced nutrition supply reduces water uptake in plants

Nitrogen may boost plant productivity, but the imbalance with phosphor reduces water use efficiency. more

The environment shapes behaviour

Foraging humans, mammals and birds who live in the same place behave similarly more

The order of life

A new model that describes the organization of organisms could lead to a better understanding of biological processes more

Grassland in place of rainforest in prehistoric South East Asia

Drastic changes of the habitats obviously promoted the extinction of large animal species and early humans in the Pleistocene more

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“The only things you want to conserve are the things you know”

Jana Wäldchen has played a key role in developing the plant identification app, Flora Incognita. We discussed with her how being able to identify different plants contributes to species diversity, which plant species are particularly under threat and how non-native species are suppressing local plants more

A Stickleback - Full of Worms

Around 40 percent of all species on Earth are parasitic – apparently a highly successful way of life. Even a fish such as the three-spined stickleback is plagued by up to 25 different parasites. more

The irresistible fragrance of dying vinegar flies

Bacterial pathogens cause infected flies to produce more sex pheromones and so expand their deadly reach more

A parasite involved in the plant alarm system

Host plants communicate warning signals through a parasite network, when insects attack more

Oil as energy source for deep-sea creatures

Scientists discover mussels and sponges in the deep sea which can thrive on oil with the help of symbiont bacteria more

Reptile vocalization is surprisingly flexible

Phenotypic plasticity of gecko calls reveals the complex communication of lizards more

Bergamotene—alluring and lethal for <em>Manduca sexta</em>

The volatile compound bergamotene increases the moths’ pollination success and protects tobacco leaves against their voracious offspring more

Bushmeat consumption decreases during the Ebola epidemic

Household income and knowledge about health risks drive the consumption of wild animal meat in West Africa more

The great tit, <em>Parus major,</em> does better in the countryside

Birds in urban settings have fewer and smaller offspring than their rural counterparts more

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