Projects funded by our Supporting Members

Beyond the annual dues, our Supporting Members each year give to a featured project that would otherwise not be in the realm of realization. Hereby, they strikingly underline their relation to the Max Planck Society. We are honored to present you a selection of past projects here.

The history of milk and humankind: the donations of the year 2017 are intended to enable an exciting project on the history of the development of dairy products and their effects on the human genome. [more]
According to the World Health Organization, almost 40 million people around the globe are affected by HIV, and more than one million suffer death due to AIDS per year. A promising research project was set up, aiming for better understanding of the resistancies and adaptation mechanisms of the HI-virus. [more]
Worldwide researchers investigate the characteristics of potentially interesting, but still unkown materials. With this project, the Fritz-Haber-Institute establishes the NoMaD (Novel Materials Discovery) Repository to host, organize, and share this materials knowledge in an open access database, a potential yet to be tapped. [more]
Pigeons are talented navigators: They can find their way back over hundreds of miles, but we still do not know exactly how they navigate. A project to find out just how pidgeons do this was funded by the Supporting Members' donations in 2014. [more]
In 2013 we used donations made by Supporting Members for an innovative historical guide and exhibition system at Harnack House in Berlin-Dahlem. [more]
The donations bestowed by the Supporting Members have first priority for a teaching lab in the new building at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt am Main. [more]
The Supporting Members generously supported a second flight of the sun observatory SUNRISE. [more]
2010 was all about tender plants: Our Members supported specific graduate programs for junior scientists at the Max Planck Institutes for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and for Social Anthropology in Halle. [more]
In 2009, the donations were used for the Bibliotheca Hertziana, the Max Planck Institute for Art History in Rome. [more]