Associated Institute - Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max-Planck-Society

Associated Institute - Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max-Planck-Society

As a private research institute, the Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience performes medical scientific projects mainly in the field of cognitive brain research. The Institute’s scientists research the principles behind the communication and interaction between the billions of cells in the brain, how the particular dynamics of the brain arise in the process, and how these interactions ultimately shape human behaviour.

The legally independent Ernst Strüngmann Institute for Neuroscience cooperates closely with the Max Planck Society: the selection of its scientists and evaluation of its research studies are carried out in accordance with the Max Planck Society’s criteria for excellence, and its Directors are Scientific Members of the MPS. The Ernst Strüngmann Institute for Neuroscience is financed by the Ernst Strüngmann Foundation which was established by the brothers Andreas and Thomas Strüngmann in memory of their father Ernst Strüngmann in 2008.

Contact

Deutschordenstr. 46
60528 Frankfurt am Main
Phone: +49 69 96769-501
Fax: +49 69 96769-555

PhD opportunities

This institute has no International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS).

There is always the possibility to do a PhD. Please contact the directors or research group leaders at the Institute.

Department Neuronal synchronization's mechanisms, its consequences and its cognitive functions

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Department Neuronal processes underlying higher cognitive functions and their deterioration in disease

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An eye looks at eight circles of different colors. Those colors activate the retinal cones to the same extent and create equally strong gamma oscillations in the brain.

Red has a signaling and warning effect. How is this color specificity reflected in the brain?

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A hand flicks a table tennis ball off a box. Curved lines trace the bouncing movements of the ball.

To explain certain brain waves, it doesn't have to get complicated at all

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ESI-researchers investigate how the brain responds to the predictability of natural images

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Communication does not require coherence

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Researchers find principle of dendritic constancy

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Master Student (f/m/d) or Research Assistant (f/m/d) - Fries Lab

Associated Institute - Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max-Planck-Society, Frankfurt am Main August 02, 2022

A new look at coherence

2021 Hempel, Katharina; Schneider, Marius; Vinck, Martin

Medicine Neurosciences

Is coherence between brain areas a mechanism for communication, or is it a byproduct of inter-areal connectivity and oscillatory power? At the Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience we added new experiments, developed and tested a model how inter-areal coherence results from communication, based on inter-areal connectivity and oscillatory power.

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How does the brain process repetitions?

2020 Peter, Alina; Stauch, Benjamin J.; Fries, P.

Medicine Neurosciences

Our perception of the world relies on the coordinated activity of many billions of neurons in the brain. We at the Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) have found evidence for a processing strategy of the brain that uses repeated encounters with a visual stimulus to respond more efficiently in a short time. Detailed knowledge of this mechanism could open up ways to use these abilities for medical therapies in the future.

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Whatever we perceive, feel or do, is accomplished through communication between neurons in the brain. Neural communication is shaped by temporal interactions between inhibitory and excitatory neurons. We at the Ernst Strüngmann Institute for neuroscience have discovered a new type of cell that might aid precise information transmission by providing the right timing.

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Information processing in the cerebral cortex

2018 Singer, Wolf

Medicine Neurosciences

In many domains, artificial intelligent systems are already able to outperform biological systems. However, some computational strategies that were realized by biological systems, in particular the cerebral cortex, differ substantially from those applied in artificial systems. Our research aims to elucidate these principles, expecting that a better understanding of the functions of natural systems will help uncover the causes of disease related disturbances and allow the design of much more efficient artificial systems.

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Neuronal patterns and the formation of memory

2017 Vinck, Martin

Medicine Neurosciences

Spontaneous activity patterns are strongly implicated in memory consolidation processes. Neuronal activity patterns and sensory responses depend strongly on behavioral state. Active behavioral states are associated with enhanced gain, the presence of fast cortical dynamics, and a reduction in spontaneous activity. Inactive behavioral states like sleep are associated with enhanced spontaneous activity, reduced response gain, and slow cortical dynamics that are temporally highly structured. These effects depend strongly on the activity of specific GABAergic interneurons.

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