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It is often referred to as the Japanese Nobel Prize: 88 prize winners from 13 countries have received it since it was awarded for the first time in 1985 - including many later Nobel Prize Laureates. Emmanuelle Charpentier from the Max Planck Institute of Infection Biology, Berlin, and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley, receive this year's Japan Prize for the development of a revolutionary new technology in genetic engineering, the CRISPR-Cas9 mechanism. Adi Shamir, from the Weizmann Institute, Israel, is honoured for his pioneering research on cryptography. The award ceremony will take place on April 19 at the National Theater in Tokyo. Credit: Hallbauer & Fioretti / Japan Prize

The Max Planck Society congratulates Emmanuelle Charpentier on winning 2017 Japan Prize

February 06, 2017

It is often referred to as the Japanese Nobel Prize: 88 prize winners from 13 countries have received it since it was awarded for the first time in 1985 - including many later Nobel Prize Laureates. Emmanuelle Charpentier from the Max Planck Institute of Infection Biology, Berlin, and Jennifer A. Doudna from the University of California, Berkeley, receive this year's Japan Prize for the development of a revolutionary new technology in genetic engineering, the CRISPR-Cas9 mechanism. Adi Shamir, from the Weizmann Institute, Israel, is honoured for his pioneering research on cryptography. The award ceremony will take place on April 19 at the National Theater in Tokyo. Credit: Hallbauer & Fioretti / Japan Prize [more]
Sometimes a single discovery can change a whole life. For Emmanuelle Charpentier, deciphering the functioning of an enzyme previously known only to experts was such a moment. The trio comprised of one enzyme and two RNA molecules and known as CRISPR-Cas9 made headlines far beyond the world of science. Since then, a lot of things have changed in the French woman’s life. She became a Director at the Berlin-based Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in early October 2015.

An Artist in Gene Editing

Sometimes a single discovery can change a whole life. For Emmanuelle Charpentier, deciphering the functioning of an enzyme previously known only to experts was such a moment. The trio comprised of one enzyme and two RNA molecules and known as CRISPR-Cas9 made headlines far beyond the world of science. Since then, a lot of things have changed in the French woman’s life. She became a Director at the Berlin-based Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in early October 2015. [more]

Charpentier, Emmanuelle

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Prof. Emmanuelle Charpentier, Ph.D.
Phone:+49 30 28460-410

Curriculum Vitae

Born on December 11, 1968 in Juvisy-sur-Orge, France. Study of biology, microbiology, biochemistry and genetics at the University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC), Paris (1986-1992). Graduate student at Institut Pasteur (1992-1995) and University Teaching Assistant at UPMC, Paris (1993-1995). Post-Doc at Institut Pasteur (1995-1996) and at The Rockefeller University, New York (1996-1997). Assistant Research Scientist at New York University Medical Center (1997-1999). Research Associate at the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (1999) and at the Skirball Institue of Biomolecular Medicine, New York (1999-2002).

Lab Head and Guest Professor at the Institute of Microbiology and Genetics (2002-2004), Vienna University. Lab Head, Assistant Professor at the Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology (2004-2006). Private Docent (Microbiology) and Habilitation, Centre of Molecular Biology (2006). Lab Head and Associate Professor at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (2006-2009).

Lab Head, Associate Professor at the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS), Umeå University (2009-2014) and since 2014 Lab Head as Visiting Professor. Docent (Medical Microbiology), Umeå University (2013). Department Head and W3 Professor at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig and the Hannover Medical School (2013-2015). Since 2014, Alexander von Humboldt Professor. Since 2015, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology. Since 2016, Honorary Professor at Humboldt University in Berlin.

 
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