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Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Max­Planck­Research Magazine

Issue 2015

MaxPlanckResearch - 4/2015

Making Music with Muscles
Thomas Fritz, Leader of the Music Evoked Brain Plasticity Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, knows how to make people happy and fearless - essentially as a kind of welcome side-effect. He conducts experiments using exercise machines with which you can create music. The experience of exercising with this equipment and simultaneously creating unique sounds not only reduces bodily exhaustion, it also puts the user in a good mood and lowers their anxiety and pain levels - effects that give rise to a range of therapeutic applications.
Issue 2013

MaxPlanckResearch 4/2013

Take a Bite or Resist?
From a very early age, children exhibit an amazing sense of fairness and justice. The older they get, the more compassion and empathy they develop. Nikolaus Steinbeis from Tania Singer’s department at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig is studying how the social behavior of children changes as they get older, and which of the brain’s networks play a role in this.

MaxPlanckResearch 2/2013

Construction in the Head
Not many Max Planck institutes can claim to have a fitness room – and that for research purposes, no less. But Arno Villringer at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig isn’t interested in hardening muscles. He wants to use the training equipment to study how training motion sequences changes the brain.
Issue 2010

MPR 1 /2010

Because I Know What You're Doing
When people work together, they have to coordinate their actions very closely. Wolfgang Prinz, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, and his colleagues are investigating precisely what goes on in their heads in the process.
Issue 2007

MPR 4 /2007

Ina Bornkessel
Ina Bornkessel is researching the underlying principles of language processing in the brain. Her interest in this subject was sparked early on – during her childhood in Tasmania.

MPR 2 /2007

How the Brain Moves Us
Ultimately, the brain serves to direct us to act purposefully and expediently. To do this, sensory impressions and experience must be implemented as planned motor activities – via a switching point, the premotor cortex. Ricarda Schubotz at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science in Leipzig is researching its function.
Issue 2002

Heft 2002

How Babies Get to Grips with the World
The Max Planck Institute for Psychological Research investigates how babies use their senses to get to grips with the world.
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