Yearbook 2017

Filter by institute

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
There are gender differences in health. Although women on average live longer, they generally suffer from poorer health than men. Researcher Anna Oksuzyan investigates the reasons at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. What adds to the complexity of her research is that the differences between men and women vary across countries and cultures. more
How do wild species respond to the climate change we currently experience? Scientists from the institute have discovered that the ability to adapt to extreme climate events is not uniformly distributed even within a single wild plant species. Hence, predictions of the future distribution of species are only meaningful if differences both between and within species are taken into account. more
For more than six centuries, a Southeast Chinese trading empire spread around the coastal ports of Southeast Asia. This trading network was built up through common language, social and cultural-religious institutions. Over the past 30 years, this large network has turned back to China, with more than a million temples being rebuilt, especially in the south-east. The restoration of these local and transnational networks is an extremely important phenomenon. Chinaʼs interaction with Southeast Asia is far more complex than simplifying models about the spread of Chinese “soft power” suggest. more
The effect of branched flow explains how even minute fluctuations in the ocean depth can focus the energy carried by a tsunami wave. A tsunami wave can focus the energy of a seaquake in certain directions where it causes devastating destruction. Current research from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization shows that minute fluctuations in the ocean depths can lead to focusing effects and generate strong height fluctuations in the tsunami wave. This formation of a branched flow has severe implications on the way we have to think about predicting tsunamis. more
A key principle for the rational design of cell factories is the stoichiometric coupling of growth and product synthesis, which makes production of the desired compound obligatory for growth. Using mathematical models and new computational algorithms, researchers at the Max Planck Institute in Magdeburg showed that coupling of growth and production is feasible under appropriate genetic interventions for almost all metabolites in five major production organisms. These results are of fundamental importance for rational metabolic engineering in biotechnology. more
Go to Editor View