Introduction of the Führerprinzip (leadership principle)

Introduction of the Führerprinzip (leadership principle)

1937
In Cologne’s Hotel Excelsior, the Senate elected Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry and Chairman of the Board of IG Farben, Carl Bosch, as President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society to succeed Max Planck. At the same time, the Senate also introduced the Führerprinzip leadership principle following its implementation by the Ministry. The new law granted the responsible Minister comprehensive powers of intervention. At 46 years of age, Director General Friedrich Glum was forced to retire and Ernst Telschow was appointed the new Secretary General. Bosch had become a captain of industry in the chemical sector under the Nazis but opposed Hitler’s policy on Jews. After the war broke out, Bosch increasingly withdrew from the Presidential office and died in 1940. After much intrigue, Minister Rust appointed Albert Vögler as President in 1941. The steel industrialist had long been closely involved with the Kaiser Wilhelm Society as Senator, Treasurer and Member of the Administrative Committee. Telschow and Vögler ensured that the “tradition and character of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society” was retained - a feat that was only possible due to their close contacts with the National Socialists. Vögler had provided generous financial support to the NSDAP (German Nazi party) as far back as 1932. On taking up office, Vögler addressed the Society: “You must be infused with the belief, virtually obsessed by it, that the results of your research today will help to guarantee tomorrow’s victory.”
 
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