Albert Einstein

In November 1915, Albert Einstein published his theory of gravitation, thus attaining international renown which was to last unfailingly until the present day, long after his death. The history of his general theory of relativity, however, took a different course. It lost its appeal in the 1920s and did not experience a resurgence until the mid-1950s. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science have traced this surprising development.

The mystery of the dark bodies

The idea that black holes exist dates back to the 18th century more

Tracking the smallest particles

The Max Planck Institute for Physics commemorates its 100th anniversary more

Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's prediction

For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos. more

Milestones of the theory of general relativity

Today, we cannot imagine modern astrophysics without the general theory of relativity: no matter if it's black holes, quasars, or gravitational lenses – it plays an important role in all these fields.  And when researchers try to track down gravitational waves, they are trying to confirm one of Einstein's predictions. The eventful history of the most famous equation of the century. more

Director in the attic

One hundred years ago Albert Einstein completed his general theory of relativity - a revolutionary description of gravitation as an inherent property of space and time. During this landmark phase of his life, Albert Einstein was supposed to take over as Director of the newly-founded Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics. However, the plan was delayed by the outbreak of World War I. more

The Renaissance of relativity

In November 1915, Albert Einstein published his theory of gravitation, thus attaining international renown which was to last unfailingly until the present day, long after his death. The history of his general theory of relativity, however, took a different course. It lost its appeal in the 1920s and did not experience a resurgence until the mid-1950s. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science have traced this surprising development. more

Astrophysics: The cosmos quakes - gravitational waves
Albert Einstein predicted their existence in the last century, but thought it would be impossible to discover them. Astronomers are now looking for them, nevertheless: gravitational waves. more
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