Dossiers

  • The ocean is her passion, the seabed her lab bench. Antje Boetius from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen always has multiple objectives in her sights: from discovery and precautionary research to technological development and scientific communication. An act that involves a tackling a lot of challenges at the same time: sometimes in rubber boots, sometimes in high heels.

    Oceans:
    Getting to the bottom of the deep sea

    October 18, 2016

    The ocean is her passion, the seabed her lab bench. Antje Boetius from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen always has multiple objectives in her sights: from discovery and precautionary research to technological development and scientific communication. An act that involves a tackling a lot of challenges at the same time: sometimes in rubber boots, sometimes in high heels.

    [more]
  • It is the end of a long journey: launched on 2 March 2004, the Rosetta space probe swung into an orbit around the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014 and set down the Philae lander onto the cometary surface in November of the same year. The mother probe  itself now landed on the comet’s nucleus – and thereby completed the mission. However, scientists will be working on all the recorded images and measurement data for a while yet. The initial findings already promise to provide a wealth of new knowledge.

    Bye, bye Rosetta!
    The European space probe’s successful mission ends on the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    September 29, 2016

    It is the end of a long journey: launched on 2 March 2004, the Rosetta space probe swung into an orbit around the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014 and set down the Philae lander onto the cometary surface in November of the same year. The mother probe  itself now landed on the comet’s nucleus – and thereby completed the mission. However, scientists will be working on all the recorded images and measurement data for a while yet. The initial findings already promise to provide a wealth of new knowledge.
  • Human language raises a large number of research questions - and Max Planck scientists are looking for the answers.
Narrating, explaining, discussing, persuading, instructing – what humans do with language goes far beyond the mere exchange of information. Without language there would be no business or politics, religion or science, law or poetry. However, the phenomenon of language holds many mysteries: What is the origin of this uniquely human aptitude? How does our native language influence us, and which characteristics has language developed in the different corners of the world? An overview of some important language-related research is presented here.

    Language research:
    Worth talking about

    September 25, 2016

    Human language raises a large number of research questions - and Max Planck scientists are looking for the answers.

    Narrating, explaining, discussing, persuading, instructing – what humans do with language goes far beyond the mere exchange of information. Without language there would be no business or politics, religion or science, law or poetry. However, the phenomenon of language holds many mysteries: What is the origin of this uniquely human aptitude? How does our native language influence us, and which characteristics has language developed in the different corners of the world? An overview of some important language-related research is presented here.

    [more]
  • For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.

    Gravitational waves:
    Detection 100 years after Einstein's prediction

    February 11, 2016

    For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.

  • After the genome, researchers are now turning their attention towards the proteome. They aim to establish a complete human protein catalogue – hoping to gain new insights into cell functions and the causes of diseases.

    Proteomics:
    From genome to interactome

    November 10, 2015

    After the genome, researchers are now turning their attention towards the proteome. They aim to establish a complete human protein catalogue – hoping to gain new insights into cell functions and the causes of diseases. [more]
  • In November 1915, Albert Einstein published his theory of gravitation, thus attaining international renown which was to last unfailingly until the present day, long after his death. The history of his general theory of relativity, however, took a different course. It lost its appeal in the 1920s and did not experience a resurgence until the mid-1950s. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science have traced this surprising development. Read more: The Renewal of Einstein's Theory of Relativity in the Post-War Era

    Albert Einstein:
    100 years of general relativity

    October 15, 2015

    In November 1915, Albert Einstein published his theory of gravitation, thus attaining international renown which was to last unfailingly until the present day, long after his death. The history of his general theory of relativity, however, took a different course. It lost its appeal in the 1920s and did not experience a resurgence until the mid-1950s. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science have traced this surprising development.

    Read more: The Renewal of Einstein's Theory of Relativity in the Post-War Era [more]
  • He revolutionised astronomy and is viewed as the pioneer of the modern sciences: Galileo Galilei. The Italian polymath – philosopher, astronomer, mathematician, physicist, engineer and talented author – was born 450 years ago, and became a legend in his own time after his trial and condemnation by the Roman Inquisition.

    Galileo Galilei:
    The Renaissance man from Pisa

    February 12, 2014

    He revolutionised astronomy and is viewed as the pioneer of the modern sciences: Galileo Galilei. The Italian polymath – philosopher, astronomer, mathematician, physicist, engineer and talented author – was born 450 years ago, and became a legend in his own time after his trial and condemnation by the Roman Inquisition. [more]


 
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