Cover Story
After the genome, researchers are now turning their attention towards the proteome. They aim to establish a complete human protein catalogue – hoping to gain new insights into cell functions and the causes of diseases.

Proteomics:
From genome to interactome

After the genome, researchers are now turning their attention towards the proteome. They aim to establish a complete human protein catalogue – hoping to gain new insights into cell functions and the causes of diseases. [more]
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If proteins are to fulfil their functions in a cell, they need to be in the right place at the right time. 

Visual proteomics – on the way to a three-dimensional protein atlas

If proteins are to fulfil their functions in a cell, they need to be in the right place at the right time. 
Can computer models reconstruct all processes in a cancer cell and a healthy cell?

Cancer as a model case

Can computer models reconstruct all processes in a cancer cell and a healthy cell?

A Library of Proteins

There are 21,000 genes in the entire human genome, and the scientific research team around Matthias Mann from the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried estimates that approx. 12,000 proteins are produced in typical human cells. This implies an enormous volume of data, particularly considering that the researchers - in contrast to genome analysis - do not just want to identify all proteins in the cells. To understand all of the cell's processes, they must also know the quantities in which these proteins exist and how they are further changed in the cells.
 
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