Yearbook 2012

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Living cells contain a variety of complex structures that control the homeostasis and communication. The systematic study of those structures on DNA, transcript and protein level has become one of the standard techniques in medical research. Recently, mass spectrometric techniques helped to explore the enormous complexity of the proteome. To achieve accurate protein quantification, the labeling of proteins with stable isotopes (also known as SILAC, stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture) was recently established. more
As the nineteenth century drew to a close, the development of infants garnered unprecedented scholarly enthusiasm, with men of science discovering in their own offspring, to borrow Charles Darwin’s phrase, “objects of natural history.” In the USA, college-educated women emerged as key interpreters of infants’ mental faculties. Exploring the at-home observations of Milicent Shinn, a University of California, Berkeley graduate, reveals how she and her female network of observers performed fieldwork in the nursery, producing groundbreaking work on the evolving of the human mind. more
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development investigate the historical development of the emotions triggered by music in the 19th and 20th centuries. Focusing on emotions as a public form of communication, they aim to decipher the emotional structure of communities: What role did and does music play in the development and cohesion of communities? The focus is less on the physiological effects of music than on how they are appropriated by groups. more

A lifespan perspective on the development of episodic memory

Max Planck Institute for Human Development Brod, Garvin; Shing, Yee Lee; Fandakova, Yana; Werkle-Bergner, Markus; Lindenberger, Ulman
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development directly compare episodic memory performance in children, younger adults, and older adults. The studies reveal that children and older adults differ in the mechanisms that support episodic memory even when performance levels are similar. In a two-component model of episodic memory the researchers attempt to capture these age-graded differences in underlining mechanisms, and demonstrate its utility for developmental research. more
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