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Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology

Max­Planck­Research Magazine

Issue 2017

2/2017

Exploring the Microbial Cosmos

The human body is home to countless microbes. The intestinal tract, in particular, is colonized by innumerable bacteria. As a young environmental microbiologist, Ruth Ley never imagined that she would one day find herself interested in the human gut and the microbiota that reside in it. Today she conducts research at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, investigating the role the countless intestinal bacteria play in our health.

Issue 2015

1/2015

Life on a Climate Roller Coaster
Climate change is radically altering the Earth’s plant and animal life. This is due not only to the rise in mean temperatures throughout the world, but also to the changes in temperature variability between both day and night, and summer and winter. George Wang, a scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, analyzes climate data with a view to researching the influence of the altered conditions on flora and fauna.
Issue 2014

Heft 2014

The Roundworm? What Teeth!
Worms, beetles and a small island in the middle of the ocean. For developmental geneticist and evolutionary biologist Ralf Sommer from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, roundworms and beetles are the actors and the island of La Réunion the stage on which a great drama unfolds: an educational piece about evolution, the diversity of nature, and how it emerges.
Issue 2012

MPR 2/2012

How Light Gets on the Nerves
The ragworm is an unusual laboratory animal. However, for Gáspár Jékely of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, this marine inhabitant has all the qualities of a perfect model organism: the larvae possess the simplest eyes in the world and later develop a simple nervous system made up of just a few hundred cells. This means that the scientist can track how sensory stimuli trigger behavioral changes.
Issue 2009

MPR 1 /2009

Kirsten Bomblies
Kirsten Bomblies uses an unassuming plant known as thale cress to examine in detail how new species are formed. Her aim is to shed light on one of the elementary mechanisms of evolution.
Issue 2008
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