Yearbook 2011

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Heart and Lung – from Development to Therapy

Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research Barreto, Guillermo; Dobreva, Gergana; Engel, Felix B.; Savai, Rajkumar
Heart and lung diseases represent a major disease burden and socioeconomic problem. Ischemic heart disease is the leading single cause of mortality, congenital heart disease the most common type of birth defect and lung cancer the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Current therapeutic efforts to treat those diseases are limited to the symptoms and rarely target the primary cause. Therefore it is important to develop better tools for early diagnosis and novel therapeutic strategies, e.g. through a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of heart and lung development. more
A newly established Max Planck Research Group is writing an epistemic history of art that focuses on the circulation of knowledge within and beyond the artist’s workshop. Between 1350 and 1750, the artist’s workshop evolved from a centre of craft practices to a place where other than artisanal bodies of knowledge (such as optics and alchemy) were exchanged. This research project highlights the role of art in the emergence of the new science and enriches the terms in which the current debate on artistic research is conducted. more
Efficient health care needs well-informed doctors and patients. Our current health care system does not accomplish either. Many doctors and even more patients do not understand the medical information and research findings that are available. At the Ernst Strüngmann Forum “Better Doctors, Better Patients, Better Decisions: Envisioning Health Care 2020,” experts from ten countries developed ideas for a health care system of the future: better health care for less money through better information. more
On average, older adults report better emotional well-being in their everyday lives than younger adults. The underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Studies at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development show that motivational processes play a role in this respect. Older adults experience motivational conflicts in their everyday life less frequently than younger people. Also, older adults attempt to optimize their well-being more often than younger individuals, whereas adolescents are more often inclined to subdue positive, or even intensify negative feelings than adults. more
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