Yearbook 2004

Filter by institute

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
The general research concept of the department of cardiac development and remodelling is characterized by two strategies: (i) a better understanding of processes that lead to proliferation of organ typical precursor cells and their coordinated differentiation during organ development and regeneration; (ii) development of pre-clinical models in which knowledge gained in approach (i) can be used to enable, improve and accelerate tissue regeneration in particular of the heart. Individual research projects are part of this concept and contained in either of these themes. Yet, it is clear that both themes overlap and that such a separation is rather artificial. Nevertheless it might help to distinguish between mostly basic and more applied scientific approaches, which hold a direct medical impact. more
In theory as well as in practice the relationship between experience, experiment and theory has changed over time. The studies concentrate on the period between the 18th and the early decades of the 20th century. Around 1800 we observe the complex interplay of practical knowledge traditions (mechanical arts, crafts) and their impact on the formation of the physical sciences. Around 1900 new experimental techniques werde developed within experimental physics, evoking a fundamental discussion about the potentials and limits of sensory experience in the sciences. more

Cognitive mechanisms in mate choice

Max Planck Institute for Human Development Pachur, Thorsten; Wittig, Jutta; Dieckmann, Anja; Todd, Peter
From a cognitive perspective, mate choice consists of three interrelated subtasks: (a) identifying features that are relevant for choosing a good mate, (b) integrating the features into a single attractiveness judgment, and (c) searching for possible partners. Computer simulations show that simple cognitive mechanisms can solve these tasks quickly and successfully. For instance, in a sequential search process such mechanisms lead to good mate choices by generating an aspiration level based on the quality of a small number of previously encountered candidates and on the feedback obtained on one’s own mate value. This aspiration level is then used to gauge the quality of future candidates; the first candidate subsequently encountered that exceeds this aspiration level is chosen. An empirical study of “fastdating” provides support for some of the predictions of the simulations and interestingly, also shows that stated preferences often do not match the features that underlie the actual mate choices. more
Go to Editor View