Yearbook 2009

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
The ability of plants to recognize herbivores constitutes a form of plant immunity that is essential for plant survival. This process relies on the ability to perceive signals from the insect, to transmit this information to unattacked tissues to anticipate future attacks and to mount defenses that reduce insect performance and/or activate mechanisms that allow plants to tolerate the damage. Little is known about recognition events that trigger plant responses. One of these recognition systems involves the perception of insect-derived molecules delivered to plant cells during larval feeding. more

Digestion and immunity in herbivorous insect larvae

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Heckel, David G.; Freitak, Dalial; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko
Herbivorous insects encounter many different types of stresses in their environment. The digestive system must cope with toxins made by their host plants to defend against herbivory, and the immune system must defend against attack by pathogens and parasites. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have discovered that these two physiological systems – digestion and immunity – interact in some unexpected ways. more
The departments of Prof. Neugebauer (Computational Materials Design) und Prof. Raabe (Microstructure Physics and Metal Forming) have introduced a new generation of simulation methods for materials development. The innovation of the approach is based on the connection of quantum mechanics, continuum theory and experiment for metallurgical alloy design. more
Sunlight regulates many environmental processes, but in particular the high-energy blue light region represents a threat that has to be detected with high confidence and to which organisms have to respond in an appropriate physiological manner. Based on in vitro investigations that reveal the molecular processes of blue light (BL)-sensitive photoreceptors, their regulatory function for microbial communities is outlined. Interestingly, the presence of BL photoreceptors coincides with blue light-induced photolyases that repair DNA lesions, and also with proteins involved in the iron metabolism pathway. more
One of the greatest mysteries in evolutionary biology to date is the widespread occurrence of sexual reproduction. A key role in its evolution and maintenance is assumed for the dynamic co-evolutionary cycles of parasites and their hosts. Using the three-spined stickleback as a model organism in laboratory and field experiments, the importance of parasite-mediated natural but also sexual selection on reproductive success and thus on Darwinian fitness can be investigated. This in turn will help to better understand the widespread evolution of sexual reproduction. more
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