Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, Saarbrücken site

Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, Saarbrücken site

Computer systems permeate our daily life. In addition to conventional desktop computing and Internet applications, sophisticated software systems can be found in almost all technical devices, from mobile phones to traffic lights. They support the operations of banks, hospitals, universities and public authorities, to name just a few. The Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, located in Kaiserslautern and Saarbrücken, carries out basic research that is dedicated to language design, analysis, modelling, implementation and evaluation of software systems, among other applications. Particular areas of interest include programming systems, the comparison of distributed and networked systems and of embedded and autonomous systems, as well as aspects of the formal modelling, analysis, security and stability of cutting-edge software engineering.

Contact

Campus E1 5
66123 Saarbrücken
Phone: +49 681 9303-9100
Fax: +49 681 9303-6029

PhD opportunities

This institute has an International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS):
IMPRS for Computer Science

In addition, there is the possibility of individual doctoral research. Please contact the directors or research group leaders at the Institute.

On Time – For Sure

Material & Technology
When a computer takes forever to load a website, it may be annoying, but it is nothing more serious than that. If, however, the electronics in a car or a plane don’t process commands exactly when they are supposed to, the consequences can be fatal. Björn Brandenburg and his team at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems in Kaiserslautern and Saarbrücken study how to construct real-time systems in such a way that it can be proven that they always react on time.
From e-mailing to online banking, the things we do on our computers on a daily basis are fraught with risks.
Twitter, Facebook and their ilk – social media are increasingly dominating the Internet. But how do messages spread across these new platforms? What role does a small clique of superinfluentials play?
Personal Portrait: Andrey Rybalchenko
No job offers available

Glasnost: Bringing Transparency to the Internet

2009 Marcel Dischinger; Krishna P. Gummadi
Computer Science
Residential broadband ISPs like DSL & cable are being used by hundreds of millions of people to access the Internet. Today, ISPs are deploying firewalls and traffic shapers to manipulate the performance of user traffic. Most ISPs do not reveal the details of their networks to their customers, preventing them from making an informed choice of their ISP. The goal of our Glasnost project is to make access networks more transparent to their customers. To date, more than a hundred thousand users world-wide used Glasnost to test if their ISPs are interfering with their peer-to-peer traffic. more