Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society

Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society

Agricultural yields have increased dramatically since the early 20th century, when the industrial production of nitrogen fertilizer started. It was the chemist Fritz Haber who explored the basic reaction of atmospheric nitrogen with hydrogen. Scientists working today at the Institute which bears his name still pursue similar purposes. They look at chemistry from a physical perspective. Their fields of research are the main characteristics of atoms, molecules and electrons, and their findings explain the behaviour of these particles in chemical reactions. They also want to understand how surface structure – of a catalyst, for example – influences chemical reactions. This information is essential for the chemical industry where more efficient catalysts are welcome.

Contact

Faradayweg 4 - 6
14195 Berlin
Phone: +49 30 8413-30
Fax: +49 30 8413-3155

PhD opportunities

This institute has an International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS):
IMPRS Functional Interfaces in Physics and Chemistry

In addition, there is the possibility of individual doctoral research. Please contact the directors or research group leaders at the Institute.

Exploiting Big Data to create innovative materials
Twelve Max Planck Society facilities are bundling their expertise in the data-driven materials sciences more
Terahertz radiation: A useful source for food safety
A compact and low-cost emitter generates light across the entire terahertz spectrum more
Better adhesion than previously thought in van der Waals force
The quantum mechanical description of the force between uncharged atoms and molecules demonstrated in real structures more
<p>Materials for the technology of tomorrow</p>
The NOMAD European Center of Excellence is set to simplify the search for new materials and previously unknown properties of materials more
Light switches on a DVD

Light switches on a DVD

July 31, 2015
Since the electronic properties of an optical storage material change faster than its structure, it could serve new applications more
Three problems, one solution: This is the special charm of a research project on which Malte Behrens and Robert Schlögl are working at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin. The chemists want to use carbon dioxide as a chemical raw material, which would keep the greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere, replace coal, gas and oil, and store renewable energy.
From plastic bags to hydrogen gas: almost nothing happens in chemistry without catalysts. The reaction accelerators often contain metals that are sometimes rare or need large amounts of energy to do their job. A research team headed by Robert Schlögl, Director at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, wanted to find out whether it was possible to do without catalysts.
Imagine vehicles that are just a few nanometers large and that clean surfaces or build molecular structures like tiny vehicles at a construction site. To bring this idea, or that of molecular electronics, out of the realm of imagination and into the real world, physicists are investigating the physics of the nanoworld.
Many years passed before the new physics discovered by
Max Planck was explained mathematically and established
as quantum mechanics.

Gerhard Ertl

MPR 1 /2008 Material & Technology
Gerhard Ertl lives for his research, but there is no grimness in
his determination. The Nobel Prize winner laughs much and
often – and is very free with his humorous remarks.
At temperatures near absolute zero, atoms act and react in slow motion, pro viding insights into their quantum properties.
No job offers available

Energy change 2.0: On the role of chemical research

2017 Schlögl, Robert
Chemistry Material Sciences Particle Physics Plasma Physics Quantum Physics Solid State Research
Considering the reduction of greenhouse gas paramount target of “Energiewende” all sectors of the energy system are to be crosslinked. However, interlinkage will only be possible by converting primary electricity into material energy carriers. We are “storing” this electricity in order to make it available to other applications and so achieve the target of sector integration into sustainable energy supply. This article deals with the integration of mobility. For chemistry that means to develop sustainable alternatives to pure electrical driving. more

Structures of peptide aggregates investigated with the new Fritz Haber Institute free electron laser

2016 von Helden, Gert; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin
Chemistry
The combination of several separation methods with the Fritz Haber Institute free electron laser has allowed to measure infrared spectra of size selected peptide-ion aggregates in the gas phase. The spectra reveal information on the peptides’ folding states, varying between helical and β-sheet. In the future, this approach of determining folding in peptide and protein aggregates can, potentially, contribute to the better understanding of protein misfolding, aggregation and the hereby caused diseases. more

In the focus of ultrashort lasers: the interplay of electronic and crystalline structure

2015 Ernstorfer, Ralph
Material Sciences Particle Physics Quantum Physics Solid State Research

Many material properties and the function of complex devices are governed by the interplay and the interaction of electrons and the atomic structure on the microscopic scale. These fundamental processes are investigated with the help of time-resolved experimental methods. In these experiments, the electrons in a material are excited by means of an ultrashort laser pulse and the response of the electrons and of the atomic structure are observed with different ultrafast techniques, revealing the interaction of electrons and lattice and illuminating effects like the dissipation of energy.

more

From thin silica film systems to the atomic structure of glass

2014 Heyde, Markus; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim
Chemistry Material Sciences Solid State Research

Structure of amorphous materials clarified. This project has so far been a big challenge due to the complexity of this material class. Modern preparation methods in combination with scanning tunneling microscopy succeed in decrypting the everyday material glass.

more

Conformation and dynamics of polypeptide chains derived from the „first principles“ of quantum mechanics

2013 Blum, Volker; Rossi, Mariana; Scheffler, Matthias
Chemistry Material Sciences Particle Physics Plasma Physics Quantum Physics Solid State Research

The properties of peptides and proteins (polypeptide chains) are fundamentally important in biochemistry as well as many other aspects of chemistry. The foundation of any quantitative predictions for such properties by computational means is a reliable determination of the structure and dynamics of specific chains. The present article demonstrates the reach and accuracy of current numerical methods for this problem that are based only on the "first principles" of quantum mechanics.

more
Go to Editor View