Yearbook 2017

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
A study at the Max-Planck-Institute for Social Law and Social Policy examines the impact of the European refugee crisis in 2015 on the subjective well-being of older natives in 10 European countries. The authors find that this impact is associated with the media attention and news coverage of the refugee influx. The impact is positive in countries with a “favorable” and negative in countries with an “unfavorable” coverage. Subjective well-being can reflect perceptions and sentiments regarding refugees that are associated with media coverage. more
European Union history was characterized by an underlying process of legal integration. At the same time, member state governments increased their political control of the integration process. In this context, the so-called “Luxembourg Compromise” of 1966 established an informal veto right in the European Communities. Member states claimed “national interests” to avoid a vote. Political and legal debates over the veto right crystallized different conceptions of European Union and their change over time. more
Private law relations in cross-border contexts have traditionally been governed by private international law. Yet rules vary from country to country, and developments in the field have not kept pace with globalisation. Consequently, in resolving cross-border dispute, courts have been turning to human rights law. more
The EU is currently in a deep, existential crisis, the “rule of law crisis”. This crisis encompasses the intentional undermining of the rule of law in certain Member States and the incapacity to maintain it in others. The EU cannot turn a blind eye to this development. Under Article 2 TEU, the “rule of law” is one of the fundamental values of the Union, upon which its entire legal system is founded. Research at the institute therefore analyses the development doctrinally, such as with the concept of “systemic deficiency”, and is working on solutions. more
Quantitative methods rank among the standard techniques of many researchers – not only in the natural sciences but also in the social sciences and the humanities. Little is known, however, about the value of quantitative methods for legal scholarship. Therefore, one of the research projects of the Otto Hahn Group on Financial Regulation at the Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance is devoted to quantitative legal studies: the statistical analysis of discrete data to answer legal questions. more
In 2017 the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg completed a study on the impact of national procedural laws on mutual trust and on consumer protection. The study embodies the most comprehensive, empirically-driven comparative investigation of civil procedure in Europe to date. It identifies areas where targeted measures would increase mutual trust as well as consumer protection, and expounds concrete proposals – some of which have already been taken up by the European Commission – to overcome the current obstacles to effective judicial cooperation and consumer protection. more
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